Asian Shiitake Tempeh Stir-Fry

Asian Shiitake Tempeh Stir-Fry

This is a super-easy, healthy, and delicious meal in minutes. Just chop, sauté, season, and enjoy! Cheers!

  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 8 oz. organic tempeh, cubed
  • 2-3 T Bragg’s liquid aminos (or gluten free/organic soy sauce)
  • 1 T maple syrup (optional)
  • 4 carrots, chopped
  • 1 large organic zucchini, quartered and chopped
  • 1 t pepper
  • 3 t Italian seasoning (or blend of oregano, thyme, basil, and parsley)
  • A few dashes each of cumin and turmeric
  • 1 dash ginger (optional) (better yet, grate fresh!)
  • 1 bunch organic rainbow chard, chopped
  • 1 small head of bok choy
  • 6 oz. Shiitake mushrooms, chopped
  • 1 handful sprouts (grow them yourself!)

In a cast iron skillet, sauté garlic over medium heat using water and a little oil if desired (optional). Add tempeh, seasonings, carrots, zucchini, mushrooms, stems of chard and fibrous white base of bok choy.  Whisk maple syrup and Bragg’s together and pour over veggies. Cook until vegetables are bright and crisp, adding a few tablespoons of water if veggies start sticking to the pan. If using a cast iron skillet, remove from heat before you think it’s done. Add the chard leaves and bok choy greens as you remove from heat and watch them brighten and soften to perfection in the residual heat of cast iron. Adjust flavor with more Bragg’s, syrup and/or seasonings to taste. Serve warm. Enjoy!

Adzuki Bean Chili and Stirfry

Adzuki Bean Chili and Stirfry

Adzuki beans are small, roundish beans that have a sweet, nutty flavor.  They boast of a low fat, high protein content and are great to cook with since they do not require soaking before cooking and they are easier to digest than some of the larger beans.  This bean is one of my favorites, so give it a try!  I picked mine up at my local food coop.     

Here are two Adzuki bean recipes.  Pair greens and Adzuki beans and you have a complete, vitamin and protein packed meal or side.  I happened to make these two dishes simultaneously since they shared the same beans and veggie sauté. I ended up with two dishes, twice as nice!

Adzuki Bean Chili

  • 2 cups uncooked adzuki beans
  • 1 swish of olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed
  • ½ cup onion, diced
  • 1 stalk celery, chopped
  • 2 carrots, chopped
  • 2 T water
  • 2 T Bragg’s liquid aminos
  • 1 t ground cumin
  • 1 t ground coriander
  • 1 t pepper
  • 1 red pepper, chopped
  • 8 oz button mushrooms, sliced
  • 2 pieces of greens, chopped (I used red kale)
  • 3 T diced jalepeno peppers
  • 2 banana peppers, diced
  • 1 cup organic frozen corn
  • 2 (14.5 oz) cans organic diced tomatoes
  • 2 T mild chili powder
  • 1 t cayenne pepper

Cook adzuki beans until tender, I used my pressure cooker. Saute garlic in a cast iron skillet over medium heat with a swish of olive oil, then sauté onion, carrots, celery. Add water, Bragg’s liquid aminos, cumin, coriander, and pepper, then sauté red pepper, mushrooms, and kale until tender.  Add sautéed vegetables to pot of adzuki beans.  Add diced tomatoes, corn, peppers, chili powder, cayenne, and additional cumin, coriander, and pepper if desired.  Bring to a boil, then simmer for about 30 minutes or transfer to crock pot and heat on low until ready to serve.  Enjoy. 

Red Kale Saute with Adzuki Beans

  • 1 cup uncooked adzuki beans
  • 1 swish of olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed
  • ½ cup onion, diced
  • 1 stalk celery, chopped
  • 2 carrots, chopped
  • 2 T water
  • 2 T Bragg’s liquid aminos
  • 1 t ground cumin
  • 1 t ground coriander
  • 1 t pepper
  • 1 red pepper, chopped
  • 8 oz button mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 bunch of greens (I used red kale

Cook adzuki beans until tender, I used my pressure cooker. Saute garlic in a cast iron skillet over medium heat with a swish of olive oil, then sauté onion, carrots, celery. Add water, Bragg’s liquid aminos, cumin, coriander, and pepper, then sauté red pepper, kale, and mushrooms until tender.  Stir in adzuki cooked adzuki beans.  Serve warm.  Enjoy!

Quinoa Salad

Quinoa Salad

Quinoa, pronounced keen/wah, is the perfect grain. Recognized as a complete protein, it has all the amino acids, fiber and nutrients your body needs to feel great. It’s very versatile, so including it on your weekly shopping list and experimenting with all sorts of flavors is important if you happen to wake up vegan and wonder what to eat next.

Quinoa.

I’ve written a few other recipes, and it’s simple to prepare. The most important basic is to wash the quinoa. This needs to be done with a screen colander, as a pasta drainer doesn’t strain small enough. I not only rinse, but soak in a bowl of water briefly. If you don’t, it can be a bit bitter.

I cook my quinoa in a rice cooker, which calls for 2:1, water:grain. It’s easy and done in about 10 minutes. I always make too much–the whole one pound bag goes in. Everytime! I just forget that it cooks up. If you have any sense, use 1/2 pound. If you don’t, enjoy leftovers all week.

This salad can be served hot or cold. I stir-fry a mixture of veggies in a dash of olive oil and a bit of water. Green and red bell pepper, onion, 3 chopped garlic cloves, cubed acorn squash (pre-cut and purchased from produce section), crimini mushrooms and broccolini. And for fun, I added some dried cherries. You could use dried apricots, cut pineapple or even cranberries. 

I cook the veggies just long enough to make them soft. Overcooking is fine, but I like the crunch, and the less/lower the heat, the more flavor and living nutrients are retained.

Once the veggies are done, I combine with the quinoa and pour on the tastiest, easiest balsamic glaze ever. 

I use this on sauce everything. And it never gets old. I might need a bit of rehab on that, but I’m enjoying myself, so until I can’t afford my 3 bottle/week habit, I guess there are worse addictions.

As I used the whole pound of quinoa and extra veggies, we’ve been eating this all week. It even went in baggies to the lake and served as a picnic lunch. 

Why Qunioa?

     * It contains all 9 essential amino acids.

     *Is close to one of themost complete foodsin nature because it contains amino acids, enzymes, vitamins, minerals, fiber, antioxidants and phytonutrients.

     *It acts as aprebioticthat feeds microflora (good bacteria) in your intestines.

     *It is easily digested for optimal absorbtion of nutients.

     *It isgluten-freeand safe for those with celiac disease and gluten intolerance.

     *It’s a superfood! It helps regulate blood sugar, enhance elimination, contributes to heart health.